BBC Newshour

With the world's 24-hour news cycle now more intense and unrelenting than ever, there's never been a greater need for a programme that cuts through the background noise and provides you with the definitive take on the big stories of the day, brought to you by the BBC's global network of correspondents, with all the information you need to keep up with world events.

Schedule:

Monday - Friday 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

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From BBC Newshour

  • UK Launches Inquiry into Blood Scandal
    An inquiry in the UK begins into how contaminated blood in the 1970s and 1980s killed nearly three thousand people. Also in the programme: Rob Goldstone on Trump/Russia ties and the rescue of an Indian Ocean yachtsman. Picture: View of a bag containing a donation of blood for use in transfusions. Credit: Science Photo Library
  • Does The US Want Regime Change In Iran?
    After conflicting comments from America's ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley and President Donald Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani, does the US want Iranian regime change? Also in the programme: the round-the-world sailor who's laid up with a back injury and stranded in the middle of the Indian Ocean, and Porsche says it will stop making diesel cars. Image: Iranians walk past mural. Credit: Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.
  • India Launches Biggest Health Scheme
    India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, has launched a universal healthcare scheme, designed to offer free health insurance to five hundred million people. He called it a historic day for India. But critics say the government has not provided enough money or infrastructure to make the plan work. We hear from the General Secretary of the Indian Medical Association. Also in the programme: As US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's accuser agrees to testify before Congress about the alleged sexual assault she suffered as a teenager -- we will hear one personal view on why so few victims come forward; and how Spain has become the new frontline for illegal migration into Europe. (Photo: India's public health system is overcrowded and underfunded. Credit: AFP)
  • Kavanaugh Accuser To Testify Next Week
    The woman who has accused President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, of sexual assault has said she will testify before a senate committee next week. Dr Christine Blasey Ford says she was sexually assaulted by Mr Kavanaugh at a party in 1982 when they were both teenagers. Mr Kavanaugh denies the allegations. Also in the programme: Iran has accuse US-backed Gulf states of being behind an attack on a military parade that killed 25 people, and after the rape and murder of a young girl in Nepal, the government responds by banning pornography. Picture: Dr Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh. Credit: Researchgate.Net/Getty
  • Iran: Deadly Attack on Military Parade
    The Revolutionary Guards in Iran say they will retaliate after militants attacked a military parade in the south-western city of Ahvaz -- killing at least 24 people. Also in the programme: Anger over a rise in the pension age once again spills out on to Russia's streets; a new book sheds light on the daring extraction of a Cold War double agent, Oleg Gordievsky; and the ornate Chinese pastry that's helping economists work out whether corruption is rising, or falling! (Photo: Soldiers ducked for cover as shots were fired. Credit: AFP)
  • UK-Europe Row over Brexit Deepens
    The leader of the European Council has criticised the British prime minister's approach to negotiations, but says he believes that a compromise over Brexit is still possible. Also in the programme: President Trump challenges the woman who has accused his Supreme Court nominee of sexual assault, demanding she provide evidence. Picture: Donald Tusk, President of the European Council. Credit: Getty Images
  • Foreign Fighters Refuse to Leave Syria
    Extremist groups who have been fighting in the Syrian province of Idlib have been told they must leave. A significant number of these fighters are foreign militants. The BBC has an exclusive interview with two British fighters who are determined to stay. Also on the programme: we hear from Tanzania where at least a hundred people are known to have died when a ferry capsized on Lake Victoria. Plus, a previously undiscovered letter written by the first suffragette to go to prison shines a light on the early days of the movement. Picture: A Syrian rebel fighter mans a anti-aircraft gun loaded on the back of a pickup truck Credit: AFP/Getty Images
  • Ban Lifted on Russia's Anti-Doping Agency
    The World Anti Doping Agency lifts the suspension of Russia's doping watchdog RUSADA. Campaigners greet the decision with dismay. Also in the programme: a powerful interview with an Idlib resident and Bobi Wine returns to Uganda. Picture: The logo of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), at the headquarters of the organisation in Montreal. Credit: MARC BRAIBANT/AFP/Getty Images
  • Idlib Resident Describes Life in Rebel-Held Syria
    In the north-west of Syria next to Turkey, Idlib is now effectively a refuge for all the civilians and militants who've fled other parts of Syria as the Assad government and its ally Russia try to recapture a country broken by seven years of war. What is life like in Idlib with the constant threat of an invasion? We hear from Rania Kisar, a Syrian-American woman who runs a school in Idlib -- she's been there since the uprising against President Assad began. Also in the programme: The Ugandan opposition politician Bobi Wine has been intercepted by police on his return to the country; and EU leaders have stressed that Britain must provide guarantees on the Irish border before they will accept a deal on Brexit. Picture: Newly displaced Syrian children arrive to a refugee camp in Atimah village, Idlib province. Credit: Reuters.
  • Korean Leaders Proclaim Steps Towards Peace
    The North Korean leader Kim Jong Un says he and the South Korean President Moon Jae-In have adopted a pact to end the "history of brutal and tragic confrontation and hostility" on the peninsula. Earlier Kim Jong Un pledged to close his country's missile testing facility in the north west of the country. Also in the programme: scientists have found that mosquitos are transferring microplastics into the food chain; and Sony is launching a version of its original PlayStation complete with 20 vintage games. (PICTURE: South Korean President Moon Jae in (L) and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang. CREDIT: Getty Images)