To the Best of Our Knowledge

TTBOOK began as an audio magazine of ideas - two hours of smart, entertaining radio for people with curious minds. It's sort of journalistic (because some of us are, or used to be, journalists), but it's never about the President's speech to the U.N., weapons inspections in Iraq, or yesterday's stock market disaster. It's the kind of show that would spend an hour on the future of capitalism, or on the roots of Islamic fundamentalism. It might also spend an hour on hair. Or salt. Or pirates, road trips, psychic phenomena, house cleaning, animal intelligence, high energy physics, or how to say you're sorry. (You'll find all those shows in our archives.) It's the kind of show where someone might mention Charlotte Bronte or Anthony Trollope in one segment, U2 or They Might Be Giants in another.
Schedule:

Sunday 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

Contact the Show

Host:
Anne Strainchamps

Anne Strainchamps is the host of TTBOOK. She co-founded the show, along with Steve Paulson and Jim Fleming, and has been a featured interviewer on the program for more than a decade. She has worked in public broadcasting at WAMU in Washington, DC, and at NPR. She has been a reporter, producer, news director, live talk show host, a food and wine columnist, and a chocolatier.

From To The Best of Our Knowledge

  • Beyond the Echo Chamber [REBROADCAST]
    <p>We live, work and play in Red and Blue tribal bubbles, filling our social media feeds with news sources that affirm our place in that order, rather than challenging it. What is that isolation doing to us? What can we do to escape it?</p>
  • Working For A Weekend That Never Seems To Come
    <p>Across professions, half of Americans surveyed say they’re exhausted from work. More and more of us feel scrambled, tired and drained. Are we facing daily lives more prone to burnout? And what can we do about it?</p>
  • Women Who Rule
    <p>Where do you go to find models of powerful women? The ancient world was full of them, real and mythic, but today we barely know their names. Why? This week we rediscover the women of ancient myths and legends.</p>
  • Center of the World [REBROADCAST]
    <p>Amidst economic devastation, producer Charles Monroe-Kane asks what it takes to survive in the Rust Belt.</p>
  • What is School For? [REBROADCAST]
    <p>Why do we have schools? To build a workforce? To create democratic citizens?&nbsp;</p>
  • The Third Act
    <p>If life is a play, what happens during the last act? What’s it like to live knowing you have a limited amount of time left?</p>
  • Is The Nation State Splintering?
    <p>All over the world, nation states are splintering. Separatism is on the rise. What causes nation states to erode? And what happens when they do? Should we fight to hold on to our nation states...or let them go in favor of something new?</p>
  • Making Waves: Live in Milwaukee
    <p>Milwaukee is a city on water, right on the shore of Lake Michigan, split by the historic Milwaukee River. How did it shape the city's history, politics, culture, and people? We find out in this live broadcast from Turner Hall in Milwaukee.</p>
  • The Secret Language of Trees
    <p>Trees talk to each other, and even form alliances with other trees or other species. Some are incredibly old — the root mass of aspens might live 100,000 years. In this hour, we explore the science and history of trees.</p>
  • Handwork
    <p>More than 38 million Americans knit or crochet. Not because they crave mittens and afghans, but because they like the way knitting feels. Handwork turns out be a powerful antidote for digital overload.&nbsp;</p>

 

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