Fresh Air

Fresh Air with Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Each week, nearly 4.5 million people listen to the show's intimate conversations broadcast on more than 450 National Public Radio (NPR) stations across the country, as well as in Europe on the World Radio Network. Though Fresh Air has been categorized as a "talk show," it hardly fits the mold. Its 1994 Peabody Award citation credits Fresh Air with "probing questions, revelatory interviews and unusual insights." And a variety of top publications count Gross among the country's leading interviewers. The show gives interviews as much time as needed, and complements them with comments from well-known critics and commentators.
Schedule:

Monday - Friday, 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM and repeating Monday - Thursday, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM on WUSF 89.7

Contact Info:

Contact the Show

Host:
Terry Gross

Combine an intelligent interviewer with a roster of guests that, according to the Chicago Tribune, would be prized by any talk-show host, and you're bound to get an interesting conversation. Fresh Air interviews, though, are in a category by themselves, distinguished by the unique approach of host and executive producer Terry Gross. "A remarkable blend of empathy and warmth, genuine curiosity and sharp intelligence," says the San Francisco Chronicle.

Gross, who has been host of Fresh Air since 1975, when it was broadcast only in greater Philadelphia, isn't afraid to ask tough questions. But Gross sets an atmosphere in which her guests volunteer... Read More...

From Fresh Air

  • Aaron Lee Tasjan Mixes Yearning Vocals And Strong Guitar On 'Karma For Cheap'
    <p>Tasjan has played in bluegrass festivals and also opened for punk bands. Critic Ken Tucker says regardless of the musical genre, the singer-songwriter's third album "proves its worth."</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=649515794' />
  • Manafort's Guilty Plea Details His Entanglement With Russian-Backed Oligarchs
    <p><em>New York Times</em> reporter Ken Vogel says that Paul Manafort engaged in illegal lobbying to burnish the image of Viktor Yanukovych, the authoritarian president of Ukraine.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=649492275' />
  • Memoirist: Evangelical Purity Movement Sees Women's Bodies As A 'Threat'
    <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/09/17/linda-kay-klein-author-photo-by-jami-saunders-photography_wide-d9ae914bf434a12632f887a288d894f898f116ed.jpg?s=600' alt='When she was 13, Linda Kay Klein joined an evangelical church that valued sexual purity. She recounts her experiences in the memoir Pure.'/><p>In <em>Pure</em>, Linda Kay Klein reflects on the "deep, long-lasting shame" caused by churches that claim women and girls are responsible for the sexual desires of men.</p><p>(Image credit: Jami Saunders Photography/Simon & Schuster)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=648737143' />
  • Neil DeGrasse Tyson Examines The 'Unspoken Alliance' Between Science And War
    <p>In his new book, <em>Accessory to War,</em> the astrophysicist argues that people who work in his field are often complicit to military development — despite being overwhelmingly liberal and anti-war.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=648693243' />
  • Wayne Shorter's 'Emanon' Is An Oversized, Mixed-Media Jazz Event
    <p>Decades after he changed modern music as member of Miles Davis' 1960s quintet, and then as co-founder of the band Weather Report, Shorter continues to break ground with a new triple album.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=648690140' />
  • Did A Real-Life Kidnapping Inspire Nabokov's 'Lolita'?
    <p>Sarah Weinman's <em>The Real Lolita</em> offers a compelling argument that Nabokov's 1955 novel had its roots in the 1948 abduction of 11-year-old Sally Horner — despite the author's claim to the contrary.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=646327577' />
  • Fresh Air Weekend: Michael Che And Colin Jost Of 'SNL'; Chef José Andrés
    <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/09/14/mary-ellen-matthews-nbc1_wide-2ec057eb4a7a06ebaa1b5ee357ee277b18333bb5.jpg?s=600' alt='Colin Jost and Michael Che will host the Emmy Awards on Monday, Sept. 17, on NBC.'/><p>The <em>SNL</em> head writers have different attitudes toward co-hosting the Emmy awards Monday night. Jost admits to being nervous, but Che says, "there's nothing to be afraid of."</p><p>(Image credit: NBC/Mary Ellen Matthews)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=647866599' />
  • A Child's Best Interest Is The Subject Of Complex Debate In 'The Children Act'
    <p>A new — and nuanced — legal drama features Emma Thompson as a family court judge trying to determine whether a minor can be forced to undergo a blood transfusion against his will.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=647856501' />
  • For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind
    <p>The <em>Turtles All The Way Down </em>author says OCD "starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have." <em>Originally broadcast Oct. 19, 2017. </em></p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=647848731' />
  • Michael Che And Colin Jost On 'SNL,' Hosting The Emmys And Hating Twitter
    <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2018/09/13/mary-ellen-matthews-nbc1_wide-2ec057eb4a7a06ebaa1b5ee357ee277b18333bb5.jpg?s=600' alt='Colin Jost and Michael Che will host the Emmy Awards on Monday, Sept. 17, on NBC.'/><p>The <em>SNL</em> head writers have different attitudes toward co-hosting the Emmy awards Monday night. Jost admits to being nervous, but Che says, "It's comedy! ... There's nothing to be afraid of."</p><p>(Image credit: NBC/Mary Ellen Matthews)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=647419146' />