Morning Edition

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with four hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.
Schedule:

Monday - Friday 5:00 AM to 9:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

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Host:
Carson Cooper

Carson Cooper is a familiar voice. He has become a favorite of WUSF listeners as the local host of NPR's "Morning Edition" on WUSF 89.7 since he took the job in 2000. Carson has worked in Tampa Bay radio for more than two decades. He has been the host of WUSF 89.7's Florida Matters since its launch in 2006. During that time he has reported on a variety of issues of importance to the community, including growth management, education, transportation, affordable housing, taxation, public health and the environment.

Host:
David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became... Read More...

Host:
Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renée Montagne and David Greene.

Traveling from Baghdad to the wreckage of New Orleans, Inskeep has interviewed the survivors of disasters both natural and man-made. He has questioned Presidential candidates, warlords, authors, and musicians. He also interviews people who otherwise would be overlooked: a steelworker, a school board member, the mother of a soldier killed in war.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the U.S. Senate, and the 2000... Read More...

Host:
Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with David Greene and Steve Inskeep.

Previously, she was the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2012, Martin started as National Security Correspondent for NPR in May 2010. In that position she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units... Read More...

From Morning Edition

  • Victims Confront Larry Nassar Over Sexual Abuse
    <p>Sentencing is underway for Larry Nassar, the former doctor for Olympics gymnasts, over his conviction for sexual assault. Dozens of victims are making impact statements and confronting him.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578810480' />
  • Sen. Michael Bennet On Immigration And Trump's Wall
    <p>NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat of Colorado, about the status of immigration reform negotiations ahead of a looming government shutdown.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578809979' />
  • Keeping Animals Away With Deer Snorts And Dog Barks
    <p>Train researchers in Japan have developed a new system to keep animals off the train tracks. Trains will blare out recordings of deer snorts and dog barks.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800278' />
  • HHS To Protect Health Workers With Religious Objections
    <p>The Department of Health and Human Services is expected to announce the creation of a new division to protect health workers who object to procedures like abortions for religious reasons.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800250' />
  • Andrew W.K. Takes Responsibility For Causing Speeding With 'Sonic Party Power'
    <p>A U.K. man was pulled over for speeding while listening to an Andrew W.K. song. On Twitter, the musician offered to pay his speeding ticket because of "the sonic party power that caused you to speed."</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800243' />
  • News Brief: HHS To Protect Religious Objectors, Trump's First Year Poll, Apple Jobs
    <p>The Department of Health and Human Services is expected to announce the creation of a new division to protect health workers who object to procedures for religious reasons.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800222' />
  • The National Parks And Ryan Zinke
    <p>NPR's Rachel Martin talks to journalist Elliott Woods, whose profile of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke just appeared in <em>Outside</em> magazine.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800292' />
  • Rep. Scott Perry On Threat Of Government Shutdown
    <p>Rep. Scott Perry, a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, speaks with NPR's David Greene about the looming government shutdown.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800285' />
  • Finding Your Lost Bitcoins
    <p>The digital currency bitcoin used to only be a big deal in small circles of libertarians, but has exploded over the last year. Some early investors are now trying to find bitcoins they lost.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800271' />
  • Republicans Blame Medicaid For Contributing To Opioid Epidemic
    <p><em>Times-Picayune</em> reporter Julia O'Donoghue talks with Rachel Martin about the rationale behind the Republican argument that expanding Medicaid contributes to the country's opioid epidemic.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=578800264' />

 

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